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Posts Tagged ‘The Who’


Invasion in the Billboard Top 30 – October 8th, 1966

(from Billboard Magazine)

(Number 1 – The Association – Cherish – 2nd at #1)

Number 4 – Black Is Black – Los Bravos – (up from #7)

Number 5 – Bus Stop – The Hollies (2nd week at #5)

Number 8 – Yellow Submarine – The Beatles (down from #4

Number 9 – Sunshine Superman – Donovan (down from #3)

Number 11 – Eleanor Rigby – The Beatles – (2nd week at #11)

Number 14 – Sunny Afternoon – The Kinks (up from #15)

Hot 100 Debuts October 8th, 1966

Number 89 – Dandy – Herman’s Hermits

Herman's Hermits - MGM 13603 - Dandy - PS

“Bubbling Under” the Hot 100

Number 112 – Ashes to Ashes – The Mindbenders

yardbirds-harbinger-complex-van-ness[1]Who - 10-67 - I Can See for MilesSt. Peters, Crispian - 05-66 - Pied Piper

Paupers - 1967 CB - One Rainy Day dave-dee-etc-01-67-save-me[1] capitol-records-10-65-make-room-at-the-top[1]

british-walkers-04-67-shake[1] bee-gees-07-67-to-love-somebody[1] Beatles - 07-64 - Three New Singles

 

 

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The Who

The Who – June, 1965

A look back – the Beatles

Beatles – April, 1964

Beatles – April, 1964

 

Beatles’ Magazine Februry, 1964

Beatles – June, 1965

The British Invasion on the Hot 100 – January 15th, 1966

(from Billboard Magazine)

Number 1 – We Can Work it Out – The Beatles (2nd week at #1)

Number 8 – Day Tripper – The Beatles (up from #10)

Number 9 – As Tears Go By – The Rolling Stones (up from #14)

Number 11 – A Must to Avoid – Herman’s Hermits (up from #15)

Number 13 – Over and Over – The Dave Clark Five (down from #6)

Number 25 – It’s My Life – The Animals (2nd week at #25)

Number 28 – A Well Respected Man – The Kinks (up from #38)

January 15th, 1966 Hot 100 Invasion Debuts

Number 98 – My Generation – The Who

“Bubbling Under” the Hot 100

Number 102 – Yesterday Man – Chris Andrews

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The Beatles – right back from where they..

…started from – just a notch away from the Hot 100’s Top Spot once again with “We Can Work It Out”.   Here is an early 1964 look back:

U.K.’s EMI – a Solid Lineup in March of 1964

A modest announcement from MGM – January, 1964

Saphires, Dreamlovers and the upstart Beatles in January, 1964

Meet two of the Beatles – January, 1964

A big push for their next number 1! – March 1964

These two LP’s now fetch a hefty price.  The stereo issue of “Introducing the Beatles” comes in several variations with the most scarce version commanding thousands!

In February 1964 – Price Each: About $4 Bucks New!

The British Invasion on the Hot 100 – January 1st, 1966

(from Billboard Magazine)

(Number 1 – “The Sounds of Silence” Simon & Garfunkle)

Number 2 – We Can Work it Out – The Beatles (up from #11)

Number 5 – Over and Over – The Dave Clark Five (dwon from #1)
(Made a mistake last Post – This song was number 1 on December 25th, 1965)

Number 18 – Day Tripper – The Beatles (up from #28)

Number 23 – It’s My Life – The Animals (up from #24)

Number 27 – A Must to Avoid – Herman’s Hermits (up from #48)

January 1st, 1966 Hot 100 Invasion Debuts

Number 94 – Yesterday Man – Chris Andrews (up from #114)

“Bubbling Under” the Hot 100

Number 1117 – Go Away from My World – Marianne Faithfull (back on the charts)
Number 121 – Walk Hand in Hand – Gerry & the Pacemakers (down from #103)
Number 122 – My Generation – The Who (peaks at #74)

 

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The Beatles charged back with…

… a double sided smash – “We Can Work it Out” and “Day Tripper” both would eventually be included on the celebrated “Yesterday and Today” album – which came out in the summer of 1966.  – Very few of us ever saw the original cover anywhere – much less in a vinyl store outlet.  Capitol Records did not want this cover to land on the American market – but the Beatles (especially John) did – and they received reluctant support from their manager – Brian Epstein – Apparently about three-quarters of a million copies were distributed – but retailers balked. A memo went out from Capitol demanding return of the ill-fated package.  Most made it back to Capitol – some did not of course – and a legend was born.  The record is not hard to locate in paste-over and cover-removed states but always commands a nice price!  For an unbelievable narrative of the entire Butcher Cover tale….visit Bruce Spizer’s website and click on the “Books from Bruce Spizer” link.

It’s a Butcher Baby!

The Who silently entered the Charts with…

….”My Generation” – a song destined to become a Teen Anthem – but likely not appreciated – topping out at number 74 in the United States.

Talkin’ bout….

The Top of the Charts December 11th, 1965

(from Billboard Magazine)

(Number 1 – Turn Turn Turn – The Byrds for the second week)

Number 4 – Over and Over – The Dave Clark Five (up from #10)

Number 15 – Get Off My Cloud – The Rolling Stones (down from #11)

Number 17 – I’m a Man – The Yardbirds (up from 22)

Number 27 – You’ve Got to Hide Your Love Away – The Silkie (down from #14)

Number 29 – Make it Easy on Yourself – The Walker Brothers (down from #16)

Number 30 – Here It Comes Again – The Fortunes (2nd week at #30)

December 11th, 1965 Hot 100 Invasion Debuts

Number 94 – Go Away From My World – Marianne Faithfull

“Bubbling Under” the Hot 100

Another Double Side Monster

Day Tripper would Win the Day

Number 101 – We Can Work It Out – The Beatles (flip side of Day Tripper)

Number 103 – Day Tripper – The Beatles – (flip side of We Can Work it Out)

Number 112 – Walk Hand in Hand – Gerry & the Pacemakers (peaks at #103)

Number 124 – My Generation – The Who (peaks at #74)

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The Who

The Who were an amazing super band first emerging in the U.S. during the month of March, 1965.  Much like the Rolling Stones debut, they entered the charts with a mere whisper.  The U.S. didn’t seem to embrace the group or their sound, which was far from the mainstays of the Invasion.  In fact, the Who entered the top ten only one time during their very long run.  Their album sales were modest as well until the last part of the 1960’s – From that point on they entered the Top Ten in the U.S. often and with emphasis!

The group came together in the late 1950’s when schoolmates Roger Daltry, Pete Townshend and John Entwhistle formed The Detours.  Prior to that both Townshend and Entwhistle had briefly played in minor bands – The Scorpions and The Confederates.  Soon they were joined by drummer Doug Sanden.  Around 1963 the group took on the name The Who, and shortly after that replaced Sanden with drummer Keith Moon who had earlier been with a group called The Beachcombers.

For a brief time they abandoned their name for The High Numbers, but soon came back to being The Who.  Then – no more personnel changes until drummer Keith Moon secumbed to drugs in 1978.

“I Can’t Explain” is shown on the Decca promotion label.  It sells for around $70 at autction.  “Substitute” was released twice by Atco Records – first in 1966 on Atco #6409 and again in 1967 on #6509.  The first version is a bit more difficult to find.

The Who bounce to Big Beat with “I Can’t Explain”!

British Invasion on the Charts March 6th – 1965

(The Temptations at Number 1 with “My Girl”)

Number 5 – Eight Days a Week – The Beatles (up from 19)
Number 6 – Tell Her No – The Zombies (2nd week at 6)
Number 9 – Ferry Cross the Mersey – Gerry & Pacemakers (up from 12)
Number 14 – I Go To Pieces – Peter & Gordon (down from 9)
Number 19 – Can’t You Hear My Heartbeat – Herman’s Hermits (up from 27)

Chart Debuts:

Number 114 – Tired of Waiting for You – The Kinks (Peaks at number 6)
Number 134 – I Can’t Explain – The Who (Peaks at number 93)

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