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Posts Tagged ‘Glad All Over the Dave Clark Five’


Rory Storm and the Hurricanes

These guys formed in Liverpool, according to chronicler Pete Frame, in 1959.  Two members of the Raving Texans, Rory Storm and Johnny Guitar were joined by Ty Brian (lead guitar), Lu Walters (bass) and Ringo Starr who came over from the Eddie Clayton Skiffle Group.  Ringo remained with the Hurricanes until late summer 1962 when he was tapped to replace the very popular Beatle drummer, Pete Best.

A very young Ringo Starr with the Hurricanes

Rory’s given name was Alan Caldwell.  When he formed the Hurricanes, he took the name Al Storm but changed to “Rory” as a tribute to Brit Rocker Rory Blackwell.  Ringo was replaced by drummer Gibson Kemp.  The Hurricanes were bonafide beat rockers, and they rose to lofty status amoung the Liverpool groups.  Dominoe Bobby Thompson would join them in 1962.  Along the way many would pass through the group including drummer Keef Hartler (1963) and bass player Vince Earl who later fronted the Connoisseurs. 

The Hurricanes enjoyed a 10 year run, finally hanging it up in 1967.  Rory passed away in 1972.

Dave Clark Five Earn Doll Honors

The only other British Invasion Group who I believe were honored with a set of likeness dolls produced by Brian Epstein’s NEMS – were the DC Five.  Dave was replicated with a full size doll with the other DC four in smaller scale.  This is a real find in the original box as shown.

Nottingham's Dolls - The DC Five

Visit the official Ringo Starr Website
Visit the Ringo Starr Blog on Blogspot
Visit Ringo Starr on Biography.com
Visit Merseybeat Nostalgia

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The Invasion proceeded quietly but the number of groups and artists reaching the U.S. shores was increasing.  22 recordings resided on the charts during this week.  The Dave Clark Five debuted with their 5th charting record “Can’t You See That She’s Mine”.  The record entered at number 68 and peaked at number 4 – their 3rd Top Ten hit.  Pictured below is a commercial promotional release by 5th Avenue Candy Bars and Columbia Records special products.  This extended play featuring other Columbia artists along with the DC5 was released in mid 1964. The song featured was “Bits and Pieces” – an earlier release in 1964

Can't You See That She's Mine & a Columbia Special Product

The Rolling Stones continued to remain almost anonymous with “Not Fade Away” fading away.  They would soon change this pattern later in the Summer.

This LP by “The Beats” came out right around June 1964.  God only knows who the “Beats” were – and only knows why anyone would purchase the record.  I did – but 40 years later.

The Mysterious "Beats" Summer 1964

British Invasion on the U.S. Charts – June 13th 1964

(Visit Joel Whitburn’s Record Research website presenting  Billboard Charts)

Number 2 – A World Without Love – Peter & Gordon
Number 4 – Love Me Do – The Beatles
Number 7 – Little Children – Billy J. Kramer & Dakotas

Number 68 – Can’t You See That She’s Mine – Dave Clark Five (Debut)

Additional Invaders in the Top 100

Bachelors – Diane; Dave Clark 5 – Do You Love Me; Beatles – PS I Love You; Millie Small – My Boy Lollipop; Don’t Let the Sun Catch You Crying – Gerry & Pacemakers; Bad to Me – Billy J. Kramer & Dakotas; Yesterday’s Gone – Chad & Jeremy; Bits and Pieces – Dave Clark 5; Don’t Throw Your Love Away – Searchers; Good Golly Miss Molly – Swinging Blue Jeans; I Knew it All the Time – Dave Clark 5; Not Fade Away – Rolling Stones; Yesterday’s Gone – Overlanders; Four by the Beatles; Wishin & Hopin – Dusty Springfield; Sie Liebt Dich – Beatles; Tell Me Mama – Christine Quaite

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May 2nd was the week that the Rolling Stones made their official debut into the U.S. Hot 100 charts with “Not Fade Away”.  It was an inconspicuous beginning for – what would turn out to be “the greatest rock and roll band of all time” as many would call them.  The song landed at number 98 the first week on the charts and would rise only to number 48.  But there was more to come – much more!  This choice was from the Buddy Holly song book – interesting full steam ahead rock and roll where the Rolling Stones usually dwelt in raunchy blues numbers in their early form.

The Dave Clark Five’s third release – a rework of the Contour hit “Do You Love Me” entered the charts at number 53 while their second charting single “Bits and Pieces” moved up to number 10.  As can be seen from the “Bubbling Under” activity on May 2nd, the Invasion groups were about to come ashore in a big way.  This early picture sleeve of the Rolling Stones is quite sought after and brings in a nice three figure price.

DC 5, The Rolling Stones & The Searchers

Invasion on the Billboard Charts – May 2nd 1964

The Top Ten
(Visit Joel Whitburn’s Record Research website presenting  Billboard Charts)
Number 1 – Can’t Buy Me Love – The Beatles
Number 2 – Hello Dolly – Louis Armstrong
Number 3 – Do You Want to Know a Secret – The Beatles
Number 4 – Bits and Pieces – The Dave Clark Five
Number 5 – My Guy – Mary Wells
Number 6 – Don’t Let the Rain Come Down – Serendipity Singers
Number 7 – Twist and Shout – The Beatles
Number 8 – Suspician – Terry Stafford
Number 9 – Dead Man’s Curve – Jan and Dean
Number 10 – Ronnie – The Four Seasons (NEW)

Hot 100 New Invasion Entries
Number 53 – Do You Love Me – The Dave Clark Five
Number 96 – Sugar and Spice – The Searchers
Number 98 – Not Fade Away – The Rolling Stones

Invasion Bubbling Under the Charts
Number 102 – Good Golly Miss Molly – The Swinging Blue Jeans
Number 104 – Yesterday’s Gone – Chad and Jeremy
Number 105 – A World Without Love – Peter and Gordon
Number 106 – Just One Look – The Hollies
Number 121 – I Only Have Eyes for You – Cliff Richard

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The pace picked up for the British Invasion in March of 1964.  With early groups The DC Five and Searchers landing second hits close behind their first – and Billy J. Kramer and Dakotas joining the Invasion, I knew something beyond the Beatles was on.  Back to Arlan’s Department Store just on Sheridan Blvd in West Denver, and just a block from Denver “Tiger Radio” KIMN, I quickly scanned the KIMN charted records (which Arlan’s used for the basis of their inventory) and the British Invasion Groups just kept popping up out of what we thought was nowhere.

April 11th, 1964 – The British Invasion

The more for The Beatles - April 11th, 1964

The Beatles maintained their tight hold on the top of the charts and two more of their “B” sides entered this week as well. 

For the Week of April 11th – 1964 – The Top Ten
(Visit Joel Whitburn’s Record Research website presenting  Billboard Charts)
Number 1 – Can’t Buy Me Love – The Beatles
Number 2 – Twist and Shout – The Beatles
Number 3 – Suspicion – Terry Stafford
Number 4 – She Loves You – The Beatles
Number 5 – Hello Dolly – Louis Armstrong
Number 6 – The Shoop Shoop Song – Betty Everett
Number 7 – I Want to Hold Your Hand – The Beatles
Number 8 – Glad All Over – The Dave Clark Five
Number 9 – Please Please Me – The Beatles
Number 10 – Don’t Let the Rain Come Down – Serendipity Singers (NEW TOP 10)

Hot 100 New Entries – April 11th – 2011
Number 74 – There’s a Place – The Beatles
Number 71 – Love Me Do – The Beatles

“Bubbling Under” the Charts April 11th – 1964
Number 130 – Just One Look – The Hollies
Number 131 – Why – The Beatles

April 18th, 1964 – The British Invasion

British Invasion April 1964

Both the Irish Group – The Bachelors – with “Diane” and Billy J. Kramer and the Dakotas (from Liverpool) with “Little Children” would enter the charts this week.  The Bachelors were brothers Conleth and Declan Cluskey who started out in 1957 as The Harmonichords.  They were joined in 1962 by John Stokes.  Billy J. Kramer was originally a Dakota and backed English early rocker Billy Fury.  The original members included Kramer, Mike Maxfield, Robin McDonald, Tony Mansfield and Ray Jones.  Mick Green and Frank Farley would replace Mansfield and Jones in 1964.  They were both formerly with Johnny Kidd and the Pirates.

The Bachelors & Billy J. Kramer & the Dakotas

For the Week of April 18th – 1964 – The Top Ten
Number 1 – Can’t Buy Me Love – The Beatles
Number 2 – Twist and Shout – The Beatles
Number 3 – Suspicion – Terry Stafford
Number 4 – Hello Dolly – Louis Armstrong
Number 5 – Do You Want to Know a Secret – The Beatles (NEW TOP 10)
Number 6 – The Shoop Shoop Song – Betty Everett
Number 7 – Glad All Over – The Dave Clark Five
Number 8 – She Loves You – The Beatles
Number 9 – Don’t Let the Rain Come Down – Serendipity Singers
Number 10 – Dead Man’s Curve – Jan and Dean (NEW TOP 10)

Hot 100 New Entries – April 18th – 2011
Number 74 – Diane – The Bachelors
Number 87 – Little Children – Billy J. Kramer & the Dakotas
Number 88 – Why – The Beatles
Number 92 – I’m the Lonely One – Cliff Richard
Number 95 – Ain’t That Just Like Me – The Searchers

“Bubbling Under” the Charts April 18th – 1964
Number 101 – Sugar and Spice – The Searchers
Number 128 – I Only Have Eyes for You – Cliff Richard

April 25th, 1964 – The British Invasion – Jackie Trent’s Brief Appearance

Jackie Trent

The Dave Clark Five’s very obscure “I Knew It All the Time” on the Congress label sneaked into the charts rising to only number 53.  The sleeve pictured here is fairly hard to locate these days.  Female Brit pop star Jackie Trent would have her first and only U.S. chart record, “If You Love Me, Really Love Me”, topping out at number 127. Read more about Jackie Trent on her web site

Dave Clark Five - I Knew it All the Time

For the Week of April 25th – 1964 – The Top Ten
Number 1 – Can’t Buy Me Love – The Beatles NEW TOP 10 ENTRY
Number 2 – Twist and Shout – The Beatles
Number 3 – Do You Want to Know a Secret – The Beatles
Number 4 – Hello Dolly – Louis Armstrong
Number 5 – Suspicion – Terry Stafford
Number 6 – Glad All Over – The Dave Clark Five
Number 7 – Bits and Pieces – The Dave Clark Five (NEW TOP 10)
Number 8 – Don’t Let the Rain Come Down – Serendipity Singers
Number 9 – My Guy – Mary Wells (NEW TOP 10)
Number 10 – Dead Man’s Curve – Jan and Dean

Hot 100 New Entries – April 25th – 2011
Number 90 – I Knew it All the Time – The Dave Clark Five

“Bubbling Under” the Charts April 25th – 1964
Number 117 – If You Love Me Really Love Me – Jackie Trent
Number 131 – Not Fade Away – The Rolling Stones

April 1964 Charting LPs

British Invasion LPs - April 1964

April 11th of 1964 also saw both “Meet the Searchers” and “Glad All Over” by the Dave Clark Five make their LP debuts.  The first U.S. Searcher LP would rise to number 22 and the DC Five’s debut would go all the way to number 3.  And the not long but eagerly awaited 2nd Capitol Records LP from the Great Ones – “The Beatles Second Album”  hit the charts with a bang!

Notice the two different versions of the Dave Clark Five album – both with instruments and without.  The without version is more difficult to located but readily available.

Visit Billy J. Kramer’s official website
Visit The Ready Steady Girls website (British Girls)

Visit “Early Sixties Music” Blogspot (Billy K. Kramer and more)

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The British Invasion February 1st, 1964

The second week of the British Invasion witnessed Vee Jay record’s third attempt to showcase – what up until then – had been a futile exercise.  But Capitol Records was now asserting itself, pulling out all the stops getting behind the Fab Four.  Vee Jay execs felt they still were in possession of a five-year contract representing the Beatles, but Capitol lawyers contended that because Vee Jay had not paid royalties to the group (for the earlier releases) that the contract was null and void.  Vee Jay said this was ridiculous as there had not been any record sales previously to pay royalties on.

Beatles and Dave Clark Five - The British Invasion

The Dave Clark Five Arrive

Vee Jay Hits the Big Time

“Please Please Me” on Vee Jay 581 hit the charts on February 1st, making it The Beatles second US charting record.  The Record was release with a nice photo sleeve, a practice that would soon be ended again by Capitol lawyers, blocking photography rights to Vee Jay.  Vee Jay would skirt this issue by using likeness artwork on upcoming releases.  The record climbed to number 3 for Vee Jay.  The special promotional sleeve show below was issued to disc jockies and some record outlets in very small numbers – It actually was released ahead of the commercial single – in mid January.  Today the very limited printing and pressing run has resulted in a collectible that commands huge dollars.

Please Please Me promotional release VJ 581

Please Please Me Rare 1964 Promo

My Bonnie and MGM Records – February 15th, 1964

In what seemed at the time as a blitzkrieg of Beatle releases – MGM had picked up the US distribution rights to the four Germany sides that had previously rested with Decca Records.  They rushed out “My Bonnie” quickly with the graphic sleeve illustrated above.  Several of us thought that perhaps the group that was performing on these various labels might not even be the same group.  After all, the Beatles were back up on “My Bonnie” and its sound was much more raunchy than the hard drive “I Want to Hold Your Hand”, “She Loves You”, and “I Saw Her Standing There”.  MGM’s entry hit February 15th, and peaked at number 26 with a short seven week run.

The Dave Clark Five – February 15th, 1964

The DC Five were originally comprised of Dave Clark, Rick Huxley, Chris Walls and Mick Ryan and formed in about 1958.  Walls and Ryan departed in 1961 with Mike Smith, Lenny Davidson and Denny Payton coming on board to finalize the group that the US would come to know (and love).  I recall hearing the Dave Clark Five for the first time in Denver back then and thinking “There are actually TWO groups from England!”  They were touted as the “Tottenham Sound” (vs. the “Liverpool Sound” or the “Mersey Beat Sound”.  Pundits liked to allude to the DC Five as “the group who knocked the Beatles from the top of the charts!” (In the UK).  This same proclamation would be afforded to other Invaders as well.  After all, the Beatles couldn’t have a record in the top spot every single week of the year.  But they came as close as anyone ever had – ever would.

The Dave Clark Five actually charted first in the UK with “Do You Love Me” – a release that would hit the US shores in the Spring of 1964.

Meet the Beatles & Introducing the Beatles
The 1st British Invasion LPs

First British Invasion Long Plays

“Meet the Beatles” hit the charts on February 1st, 1964 and one week later “Introducing the Beatles” arrived.  For the first time with Rock and Roll, LPs would become not only significant, but almost as important as 45s initially, and later – more so.  “Meet the Beatles” would climb quickly to number 1 – staying there for 11 weeks, and enjoy a 71 week stay.  “Introducing the Beatles” climbed to number 2 – held off by the Capitol offering only – remaining at number 2 for 9 consecutive weeks, and running for 49 weeks.

Visit the Dave Clark Five Website

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